Totem pole

Proclaimed in 1990, November is Native American Heritage Month and we encourage you to learn more about its history and cultural significance. Congress chose this month because it concludes the traditional harvest season and was generally a time of thanksgiving and celebration for Native American tribes.

Seattle’s roots are that of its namesake: Chief Seattle, of the Suquamish and Duwamish people. Today, Native American stories, art, language, and culture influence much of our experience throughout the United States. Understanding and appreciating our region’s history is vital in order to move all communities forward in prosperity.

While many organizations such as Visit Seattle and Daybreak Star Indian Culture Center have a full schedule of events to educate people about the history and contributions of Native American communities to our booming region, we're especially proud of the work Chief Seattle Club (CSC) is doing.

The Chief Seattle Club (CSC) is dedicated to physically and spiritually supporting American Indian and Alaska Native people. “We believe in the power of ancestral ways, and preserving them means fostering a sense of community among those without one to call their own.”

CSC provides hot meals, health and wellness services, social workers, homeless and transitional services, computer access, traditional and cultural services, legal assistance, a Native art program and gallery, outings to tribes and museums, and more to Native Americans in need.

To learn more about Chief Seattle Club or get involved with this important work, click here.

Looking for educational experiences? Visit Seattle recommends art exhibits at the Burke Museum, Seattle Art Museum, Stonington Gallery, and Steinbrueck Native Gallery. The Duwamish Longhouse and Cultural Center is worth a visit, as are regional tribal cultural facilities such as a Suquamish Museum and the Tulalip Tribes’ Hibulb Cultural Center. Download Visit Seattle’s Native American Heritage Guide for more.